FIVE ways the UK heatwave could affect Wimbledon

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Updated: July 1, 2015

We’re used to seeing pretty high temperatures at Wimbledon, it is of course a summer competition.

Just not quite this high. The Met office expect temperatures to reach 33 degrees today in Greater London, as Britain sizzles in the middle of a heatwave.  So..here are 5 ways the temperatures could affect Wimbledon!

 

BOUNCIER BALLS

Whether it’s the big names on centre court or less well known players in the first few rounds, we’re used to seeing tennis players bounce the ball several times before they make a serve.  Over the next few days-we could see alot more of this bouncing. That’s because scientists say in hotter weather tennis balls bounce higher.

Simply speaking it’s a result of gas molecules inside the tennis ball expanding. The increased energy inside the ball results in a higher bounce. Keep your eye out!

 

ABOVE 30 DEGREES? Take a break-if you’re a WOMAN

On the face of it, this seems up there with one of the most sexist sports ‘rules’ there is. But its not that men can’t take a break-that’s up for Wimbledon to decide and isn’t obligatory.

However the rule about women was created over 20 years ago by the Women’s Tennis Association  which says if the temperature gets higher than 30.1 degrees then female players can take a ten minute break.

 

A cheeky glass of… mineral water, please!

Forget Pimms and champagne, its been three days since Wimbledon began and already the queues for the water fountains are said to be considerably longer than those at the bars. Could this be one of the driest tournaments yet?

 

Pre-cooling to avoid heat exhaustion

No matter how many bananas players eat in between sets, there’s no question that being in very hot temperatures for prolonged periods of time can cause a loss in bodily fluids-leading to heat exhaustion.  Of course many elite players at Wimbledon will be used to playing in hot conditions, most recently in the middle of the French Open. To prepare their bodies some players take part in ‘pre cooling’ before a match. Think ice baths, cool showers and plenty of cool drinks!

 

What heatwave?!

Because we’re not used to this kind of heat in this country-its easy to make the assumption tennis players struggle with it too. As enthusiastic tennis fans will know-these temperatures are not anything new, especially for the ‘elite’ players. Competitions in France and Australia have seen temperatures exceed over 35 degrees-rather them than me!


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